Grotian Moment: The International War Crimes Trial Blog
Grotian Moment: The International War Crimes Trial Blog
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Case Western Reserve University School of Law
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Simone Monasebian

Email: Simonejustice@aol.com
Phone: (917) 294-5762


Simone Monasebian has extensive experience in prosecuting and defending accused war criminals, as well as providing media commentary on and teaching war crimes related subjects. Ms. Monasebian is currently the Chief of the New York Office of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), which is tasked with promoting justice globally. She is also CourtTV's Legal Analyst for the Saddam Hussein Trial, and an Adjunct Professor of International Criminal Law at Seton Hall Law Schoolís Cairo program, at the American University.

Prior to her appointment with the UNODC, Ms. Monasebian served as Principal Defender of the Special Court for Sierra Leone. Pursuant to U.N. Security Council Resolution 1315 (2000), the Special Court, is mandated to try those who bear the greatest responsibility for war crimes committed in Sierra Leone since 30 November 1996. As the Principal Defender at an international war crimes tribunal, Ms. Monasebian was responsible for developing the Defence Office and ensuring the rights of suspects and accused persons by providing an institutional counterbalance to the Prosecution.

Before joining the Special Court, Ms. Monasebian was a Trial Attorney with the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda ("ICTR"), Office of the Prosecutor, where she prosecuted war criminals in complex, multi-defendant cases pursuant to U.N. Security Council Resolution 955 (1994). She was one of the prosecutors responsible for the December 2003 landmark convictions of three media executives who fanned the flames of genocide in their newspaper and radio station. That case raised important principles concerning the role of the media, which had not been addressed at the level of international criminal justice since Nuremberg.
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