Milton A. Kramer Law Clinic Center
Milton A. Kramer Law Clinic Center






Milton A. Kramer Law Clinic Center
P: 216.368.2766
E: lawclinic@case.edu

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Civil Litigation Clinic
Students in the Civil Litigation Clinic learn to apply their two years of classroom training to serve the needs of clients with a wide range of legal problems that find their way into civil litigation.

I did a lot of research on small legal issues and had to analyze the general legal principals in light of a very specific fact pattern that was not on point with any horn book. Supervisory meetings were very helpful in working out these issues and trying to apply them to the actual client cases.
Student Comment

The nature of the problems can vary considerably. Some of our clients have been sued on old credit-card debts by collection agencies that have inadequate documentation. Some of our clients are victims of home-remodeling scams and have overpaid fly-by-night contractors for shoddy work or for work that is never performed at all. Some are involved in car accidents or other torts. Some get into money disputes with family members.

Whatever the problem, our clients need legal representation, and our students provide it. Students, working in teams of two, have primary responsibility for every step of the process, from the initial client interview through the trial and appeal. Students learn to draft pleadings, prepare and respond to discovery requests, and take and defend depositions. They craft legal strategies and legal arguments. They write briefs and appear in court. And they negotiate settlements. Along the way, the clinical faculty members provide guidance and direction in weekly supervisor meetings, and they review and approve all written work. But the students are the ones on the front lines with clients, opposing counsel, and the court.

And we constantly learn. In both our case work and our weekly seminar, we learn about the law, the profession, our ethical responsibilities, and the nuts and bolts of law-practice management. We focus heavily on the quality of our written work product. We learn how to deal with the real-world problems that lawyers face every day - like difficult opposing counsel and a judicial system that can sometimes seem inefficient and unfair. And we constantly see how important a difference our work makes to the clients we serve.

I had to deal specifically with conflicts of interest and other PR rules with my clients and the experience was the only lesson I have really had in dealing with these types of issues throughout my entire law school curriculum.
Student Comment
Civil Litigation Clinic Faculty:
Concentration credit is granted for Clinic work