Lectures & Events

“The United States and the Future Development of Global Competition and Consumer Protection Policy”
Center for Business Law and Regulation - Dean Lindsey Cowen Business Law Lecture
MAR 18, 2010
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Moot Courtroom (A59)

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is a domestic agency with an expanding role in the formulation of international policies concerning competition and consumer protection. An increasing amount of commerce within the FTC’s competition policy and consumer protection jurisdiction involves cross border transactions and is subject to scrutiny by numerous competition and consumer protection agencies overseas. The content and quality of enforcement programs and related decisions taken by foreign authorities in matters such as merger control and privacy exert ever greater influence on the U.S. market and the conduct of American firms.

The increasing interdependence between U.S. and foreign regulatory policy has demanded that U.S. competition and consumer protection authorities engage themselves more extensively in international affairs. This has required a significant adjustment in the orientation and perspective of the FTC. This presentation addresses the modern transformation of the FTC’s international programs and emphasizes their importance to the fulfillment of the Commission’s traditional competition and consumer protection responsibilities. It focuses on the importance of investments in intellectual leadership as means of exercising global influence in an environment that features over 105 jurisdictions with competition laws and a larger number of countries with consumer protection regimes. The presentation suggests what U.S. agencies must do if they are to have a major hand in setting international standards for competition policy and consumer protection.
Speaker Information
William E. KovacicWilliam E. Kovacic
U.S. Federal Trade Commission

William Evan Kovacic is a member of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. He is on leave from the George Washington University Law School, where he joined the faculty in 1999. Professor Kovacic began his service as an FTC Commissioner on January 4, 2006. From June 2001 through December 2004, he served as the FTC’s General Counsel. From March 2008 to March 2009, he served as the agency’s Chairman.

At George Washington, Professor Kovacic taught antitrust, contracts, government contracts, and a seminar in comparative government procurement law. He previously taught courses or seminars on Economic Law Reform in Transition Economies, Property, Quantitative Methods for Lawyers, and Unfair Trade Practices.

Professor Kovacic received an A.B. degree from Princeton University in 1974 and a J.D. degree from Columbia University in 1978. In 1978-1979, he was a law clerk to the Honorable Roszel C. Thomsen, U.S. District Judge for the District of Maryland. From 1979 to 1983, he worked at the FTC, first with the Bureau of Competition's Planning Office and later as an attorney-advisor to Commissioner George W. Douglas. From 1983 to 1986 he was an associate with the Washington D.C. office of Bryan Cave, where he practiced in the firm's antitrust and government contracts departments. From 1986 to 1999, he was a professor at the George Mason University School of Law. Before completing law school, he also served for one year on the majority staff of the Subcommittee on Antitrust and Monopoly of the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

Professor Kovacic is a Past Chair of the Antitrust and Economic Regulation Committee of the Association of American Law Schools. He is co-author, with Andrew I. Gavil and Jonathan B. Baker, of Antitrust Law in Perspective: Cases, Concepts and Problems in Competition Policy (Thomson West, 2d Edition, 2008) and is co-author, with Ernest Gellhorn and Stephen Calkins, of the Fifth Edition of Antitrust Law and Economics in a Nutshell (Thomson West 2004). Since 1992 Professor Kovacic has served as an advisor on antitrust or consumer protection issues to the governments of Armenia, Benin, Egypt, El Salvador, Georgia, Guyana, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Panama, Russia, Ukraine, Vietnam, and Zimbabwe.
Additional Information
Open to the public at no cost. One FREE hour of CLE credit will be available to lawyers who attend. Please note - Recording in any form is prohibited.

Supplemental Readings:
· Kovacic Bibliography
· Competition Policy, Consumer Protection

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